From Hardlimit

  • Schwim Dandy
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    6 months ago

    I don’t think the issue is performance though. The unspoken part of this comparison is in bold:

    “Linux vs Windows tested in 10 games. In the games we could find that work on linux, the performance was 17% faster on average. In all the rest of the games, Windows worked 100% better.

    • @[email protected]
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      1376 months ago

      Fortunately majority of games work on linux. The major pain point now is the anticheat used by multiplayer games. Single player games more or less work out of the box

      • Yote.zip
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        756 months ago

        To add on here, you can use the Are We Anti-Cheat Yet? site to track which games are not working due to anti-cheat. In my experience it’s extremely rare for “Linux” (aka Wine/DXVK/VKD3D/et al) to not support arbitrary games. If a game is not working on Linux it’s almost certainly because of an anti-cheat or some bloated/obscure DRM telling Linux “no you cannot run this”.

        • @[email protected]
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          46 months ago

          Sadly anti cheat is much cheaper for devs than fast manual moderation. And a cheater infested game dies off much faster.

          • @[email protected]
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            56 months ago

            And client-side anticheat solutions aren’t great at preventing cheating, anyways. Anticheats are still bypassed by smart software design or by using third-party devices, like the Cronus. COD’s intrusive newer anticheat didn’t stop hacking in ranked play this past year, for instance.

            I recommend this video from Serious, who has experience with modded clients and developed a patch to secure BO3 when it was unsafe to play.

            • @[email protected]
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              6 months ago

              Just making it harder to cheat and having a way to patch it and instantly get a wave of bans does discourage cheating quite a bit. Especially in paid games. You will never get rid of cheating completely, but cutting down on it and discouraging it is the name of the game.

      • mifan
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        6 months ago

        I really want to switch to Linux, but I’ve been told this before and then ended up spending hours trying to get everything to work, and usually give up … but it’s been a couple of years since I tried the last time, so is this the right time?

        I have zero interest in the technical parts of Linux or setting things up. I want things to work out if the box. I may have to dual boot because of WoW and MS Flight Sim, but if everything else works it may be worth it.

        Edit: wow thanks for the answers. You may have convinced me to try again.

        • @[email protected]
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          336 months ago

          Check out protondb to see how your game collection fares on linux. I personally just buy games without checking these days and play on linux but then again I buy older games. Although AAA games also tend to work these days within days of release

          • @[email protected]
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            6 months ago

            Although AAA games also tend to work these days within days of release

            And TBF, Far too many AAA games tend to not work well on Windows within the first few days of release either. Even a few like elden ring that worked better on Linux before Windows. Though I still avoid getting games on their release date. You are generally going to have a far better experience on either system by waiting a bit and seeing what others say about it.

        • @[email protected]
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          146 months ago

          It greatly depends on the type of games you play, the vast majority of things I play I just hit play on Steam and that’s it. Sure I had to do some setup, i.e. install Proton-GE and set Steam to use it as default for all games, otherwise only some games that Valve tested are available, but all in all it’s almost 0 setup.

          That being said that’s been true for years, so I doubt that if you had a bad experience in 2021 it’s going to be much different now. Also you need to realise that not even Windows is out of the box, you had to install drivers and programs, PCs are not consoles and with customisability comes the need to setup. And even though you don’t have interest in the technical part of Linux you’ll need to learn some of it, just like you did for Windows, and most importantly you’ll need to forget the technical parts you know of windows that are different on Linux, that’s usually one of the biggest problems I see, people trying to use Linux as if it were Windows and having a bad time.

          • mifan
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            46 months ago

            You’re right - but I’d say things on newer windows versions are pretty much out of the box. It may ask for driver installs, but that’s often just pressing a confirmation box.

            It’s not that I’m afraid of the technical stuff - I am a windows sys admin and software developer. I just have bad memories of hours of getting drivers to work on Linux. I’m sure, that if I make the change and are happy, eventually I’ll take a deeper dive. But it takes a good first time impression to get there.

            • @[email protected]
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              46 months ago

              You’re right - but I’d say things on newer windows versions are pretty much out of the box.

              Well the game is purposefully built for windows. It is not a surprise that it is out of the box. What is pleasantly surprising is that this is also true for linux - a platform which most of these games do not support

          • @[email protected]
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            36 months ago

            Maybe i am getting old, but if someone says they used something a couple years ago, then i dont assume its two years ago. more like 10 years or so. Dont have a problem with the rest of your comment

        • @[email protected]
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          6 months ago

          If you have AMD, for most titles it is as simple as installing a distro and then installing Steam. Then on Steam you will have to enable the compatibility tools, that is it. For Nvidia, setting up the drivers is a bit more finicky, however some distros will preconfigure it for you (such as Nobara, although personally I had a couple issues with this distro, YMMV)

          You can search for games status on Linux via ProtonDB. In my experience they just work.

          For WoW you might need to look up a YT tutorial to figure out the file paths, but the tldr is you need to install Battle.Net as a Non-Steam game, then launch it through Steam. This is generally a good, easy method for most non-steam titles, just installing it and adding it as a non-steam game.

          According to ProtonDB flight sim should work, I habe no personal experience here.

          • mifan
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            26 months ago

            Thanks for the answer - I’ve usually just gone with Ubuntu. Would that still be the recommended distro for gaming?

            • Skelectus
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              6 months ago

              If you’re unsure and just want something easy, my recommendation is Pop OS. I think it has replaced Ubuntu as the generally recommended works-out-of-the-box distro.

              Pop is Ubuntu based and inherits most of its good qualities. I consider it mostly an improvement, especially for gaming.

            • @[email protected]
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              6 months ago

              It doesn’t really matter which distro you use for gaming, just get one that is popular and well-supported such as Kubuntu or Fedora or Pop!_OS or whatever. Ones like Arch and Gentoo would be pretty complicated so I wouldn’t recommend those until you feel comfortable.

            • @[email protected]
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              26 months ago

              Ubuntu was kind of dethroned in the last several years (Canonical has shit the bed a bit). For a gaming focus, I’d rather suggest Bazzite (SteamOS alternative), or ChimeraOS.

              If you want something a bit less gaming focused and traditional: Try Pop! Os

              • fckgwrhqq2yxrkt
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                36 months ago

                Pop! OS lets you try out a tiling windows manager as well without having to fully comit to it right away. Once I got used to it I loved it, so much easier to set up an efficient usable display layout.

              • Polar
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                26 months ago

                Ubuntu is the best bet for a distro to just work well out of the box.

                Granted I have still had a fuck ton of issues, errors, etc, but Ubuntu is the only distro that has worked the best out of the box. Fedora was a broken mess, and Mint was in between.

                So if you want anyone to not give up on Linux, direct them towards Ubuntu first. You can always switch distros later, but spending 3 days trying to fix issues on a different distro isn’t fun.

                • @[email protected]
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                  46 months ago

                  That’s not accurate anymore. Canonical has dropped the ball lately (one word: snaps). Pop OS is way more sensible for gaming.

            • @[email protected]
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              16 months ago

              That has been my go-to in the past, but I am not sure if it is still, I have enough past linux experience that I just went with arch after trying nobara and couldn’t be happier. For all the memes of it being hard, especially if you go with something like EndeavourOS, it is fairly simple, the package management is superb and I do not have to bother with things like Flatpaks.

        • @[email protected]
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          86 months ago

          I can’t speak for both games you listed, however for WoW - Blizzard games tend to have a good reputation for running on Linux (one of the few good things I like about Blizzard). Sometimes there are a few bugs here and there (OW had a mouse cursor locking problem) but generally they’re pretty good.

          I have been playing Diablo 3 on Linux for as long as I can remember, even before the massive rise of Linux gaming from the introduction of VKD3D/DXVK/Proton. I know D4 was working in Linux even during the betas, and I’ve heard StarCraft players who’ve said the same.

          Of course, the system requirements never mention Linux as an officially supported platform, but I can’t say I’ve ever heard of a Blizzard game that doesn’t work on Linux (games they develop - games like CoD and originally Destiny 2 where they were only the publisher/launcher host is a different story) so I’d be very surprised if WoW doesn’t work.

          IIRC Blizzard’s anti cheat (“Warden” I believe) is mostly server side which makes things way easier - I mean hell I know a lot of their games even supported Mac OS.

          And as the others have linked, for MSFS you can check Proton but I hear the reception is good there too since it’s rated as Silver on there.

          These days I’m usually just playing the Diablo games from them, and I just use the Bottles app which makes it really easy to play non-Steam games. It even has an option to install the Battle.net client for you, then you login, install the game, and click play - it’s super simple.

          • mifan
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            46 months ago

            Thanks for the feedback - I’ve installed Pop OS tonight and installed bnet, wow, unreal engine, rocket league and steam.

            Battle.net had a few problems because of the host file, and Vulkan apparently needed some fiddling - but at apart from that, I must say everything runs smoothly.

            I look forward to test a lot of things deeper - but for now it very much seems like an experience I could get used to.

            • @[email protected]
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              26 months ago

              Glad to hear that its working smoothly there! Definitely don’t hesitate to let us know here if you have any questions about anything! There is also [email protected] for a more gaming-centric Linux community as well.

          • mifan
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            26 months ago

            Apart from wow and flight sim, I play rocket league, satisfactory, old school monkey island (and other point and click games) and FIFA from time to time and I make small game projects in unreal engine.

        • @[email protected]
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          26 months ago

          Can’t promise anything, but a few years has made a pretty huge difference here. If the game you want to play is on Steam and doesn’t have weird anticheat, it’ll likely just work. If it’s not on Steam, try Lutris.

          If the game you want to play still doesn’t work, post here and say “LINUX BLOWS BECAUSE IT CAN’T PLAY THIS GAME” and then you’ll get a dozen different ways to make it run

      • @[email protected]
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        36 months ago

        Lots of good games are still not working properly (e.g. Nioh), also modding support is very lacking and cumbersome.

        • @[email protected]
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          26 months ago

          I had some trouble with Nioh, but I remember it working perfectly after trying a few things

          That was last year though, I don’t remember what exactly I did to make it work

            • @[email protected]
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              26 months ago

              Oh right, the light attack not working unless left-clicked once. Yeah, that’s a weird one. Cutscenes were borked every now and then, true.

              But all in all, I had a good time playing it, which is probably why I remember it having less issues than it actually does.

        • @[email protected]
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          126 months ago

          What do you mean with out of the box, if you play steam games that is pretty much install and play, For Epic and GOG I use Heroic Game launcher with the same success.

            • @[email protected]
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              86 months ago

              I’ve played Skyrim and Fallout 3 & 4 on Linux, and Uncharted. They worked just fine.

              You need to enable Proton for all ‘unsupported’ titles in Steam (literally two clicks). After that…the only games I’ve found that don’t work are down to anti-cheat. I used to occasionally have to change the Proton version for some games, but it’s been a while since I had to do that.

              It’s nothing like gaming on Linux was 10 years ago. It’s much more like gaming on Windows, the last time I did it: you occasionally find a game that needs tweaking, but 95% work flawlessly.

            • @[email protected]
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              76 months ago

              They do work without steam. Steam has just streamlined the process.

              And of course you’d need a compatibility layer (e.g. wine/proton). But those aren’t dependant on Valve. Even though they’ve definetly benefited from their involvement.

        • Dandroid
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          106 months ago

          What do you mean? I use Linux on my laptop and on my steam deck, and for 99% of the time, I just hit the launch button and it works. Actually yesterday I had the first time where I needed to change the proton version, which was 2 clicks and then it worked perfectly. But that was literally the first time I had to do anything other than hit launch.

            • @[email protected]
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              6 months ago

              Just because the original response seems so ignorant. Like have you actually tried it? Have you looked up the user experiences? Why am I supposed to provide the links when you are making the claim? As another user mentioned most things are seamless to run. Yes they require wine/proton as a compatibility layer, but steam does it seamlessly, it is as easy as enabling the compatibility in steam options and pressing install, then play. And this generally works for non-steam titles as well, you just add the non-steam title and let steam handle the rest.

              The OP of the video wrote himself that his process for setting up the games in the video was : install OS, install steam, install game, launch game on both windows and linux.

          • @[email protected]
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            -36 months ago

            No, especially AAA releases usually do not, or least not right away. For example according to ProtonDB Starfield (and yes I know, most people here don’t like it - but I do) still doesn’t work reliably, especially not on Nvidia cards. And no amount of indie puzzle games makes up for AAA titles working hassle free and on day one for the vast majority of users.

            • @[email protected]
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              6 months ago

              For example according to ProtonDB Starfield (and yes I know, most people here don’t like it - but I do) still doesn’t work reliably, especially not on Nvidia cards

              This is an nvidia driver issue more than a proton/wine issue. When amd releases terrible game drivers on windows, amd is blamed so why is linux blamed when it is nvidia’s fault¿?

            • @[email protected]
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              46 months ago

              I don’t mind waiting a week until the relevant things are fixed, why do you need to play something the moment they are released?

              BG3 worked for me on the week of release, I did not buy / test it on the day of releas however, but afaik all it needed to work fine was a switch from Vulkan to DX12

              Its not a matter of it being AAA or Indie. Yes some games don’t play well or at all. Most games do, and they do it seamlessly.

              According to ProtonDB Starfield works, with less FPS and some (rare crashes). I would bet my left nut that the main reason is that bethesda released a buggy incomplete mess and left it to the modders to complete for free. And if bethesda hadn’t put out spaghetti it would probably just work with proton.

              • @[email protected]
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                16 months ago

                I usually don’t, I’d like to but I generally don’t have the time for it. But many people do play on launch day, as you can see looking at the player charts on Steam. You can’t say “gaming on Linux works, you don’t need Windows” and then have all these little caveats. For the vast majority of people something either works when they click “Play” or it doesn’t work at all. This is an enthusiast community, but most people just aren’t that.

                And I’ll admit that I didn’t recheck Starfield before commenting. Nice to see, it was a no-go on Nvidia initially.

        • @[email protected]
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          6 months ago

          TBH, not all games works on windows out of the box either. It usually is better than Linux, but I always need to do some adjustments when playing on desktop; to really work with minimal effort, it needs to be a console.

        • fckgwrhqq2yxrkt
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          16 months ago

          Outside of invasive anticheat, everything I’ve wanted to play has worked, and often better than it did in windows.

    • circuitfarmer
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      6 months ago

      I’d argue that the idea that most games don’t work on Linux is a flat-out misconception in 2023.

      It’s hard to quantify, but Valve’s own Steam Deck (=running on Linux) verification stats have 70% of games either Verified or Playable (Playable generally means that it runs but text is small on the Deck screen, or it needs a lot of keyboard input – nothing that matters on the desktop). Crucially, “Unsupported” doesn’t mean it doesn’t run – it means untested, and in my experience at least, many of those just work too.

      Protondb shows 80% of its catalog with a Platinum, Gold, or Silver rating – 70% are Gold. Silver generally corresponds to e.g. switching to Proton Experimental, which is a single-click process.

      Anecdotally, after being gaming only on Linux for more than a year, with a catalog of 500+ games, I’ve had one (1) that gave me any more trouble than that Proton Experimental switch (Assetto Corsa, first one).

      So there is no “unspoken part” here. The experience running Windows games on Linux isn’t what it was even 2 years ago. It is, for many people, an entirely seamless experience now.

      PS: seeing Windows games running better on Linux isn’t a new observation either. Elden Ring was a great example where Proton shader precaching eliminated the stutter that plagued that game at launch, so it didn’t happen on Linux.

      • @[email protected]
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        106 months ago

        Wait…so, if i understand this correctly yeah…the Deck might upen us all up to a future of Linux as our operating system as gamers?

        Seeing how popular it is etc, might that actually be on purpose? Excuse me being dumb, i just play games and that’s it basically no real computer tech knowledge.

        • @[email protected]
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          96 months ago

          That was always Gabe’s intention with SteamOS when it came out around a decade ago. He has never really liked windows, and definitely never liked the potential for Microsoft to mess with his product. SteamOS was made from the ground up to supplant windows as the primary gamer OS, we are just now witnessing the turning of the tide.

        • @[email protected]
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          66 months ago

          Gabe Newell has been openly critizicing Microsoft for quite some time now and therefore, Valve has been pro Linux for years.

          It is not too far fetched that the Steamdeck is their second attempt to make Linux gaming more widespread after the failed “Steamboxes”. This and they took the opportunity to make a PC-Switch knock-off when the market was perfectly ready for it.

      • @[email protected]
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        66 months ago

        “Proton shader precaching eliminated the stutter that plagued that game at launch, so it didn’t happen on Linux.”

        I’ve been meaning to ask, and it probably should be it’s own thread, but when launching a game and it says ‘Processing Vulkan Shaders’, does allowing it to partially process do anything.

        Warframe for me will quickly jump to 33%, then do about 1% per 10-20 seconds. I don’t want to wait 10+ minutes to reach 100%, but does letting it get to like 40-60%, then hitting skip, at least keep the processed sharers, or does it skip/dump and process on demand? Basically, is Immediate skip vs giving it a minute or two before skipping worth anything?

        • @[email protected]
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          46 months ago

          If you let it run through once, it should cache the compiled shaders so it will recompile only after the game or your gpu drivers are updated

        • circuitfarmer
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          46 months ago

          I can only speak from my own experience on this one, but depending on the game, letting it complete means less stuttering the first time you see some shader effect in-game. My understanding is that it offsets processing that otherwise has to happen during runtime.

          I’ve seen conflicting reports of how worth it that is, and I suppose it probably comes down to a lot of factors, in particular the game itself and the power of the hardware it’s running on.

          I tend to let it complete always, but for me that’s generally less than a minute. Gives me time to get my gaming beverage ready, haha

      • @[email protected]
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        6 months ago

        “gave me any more trouble than that Proton Experimental switch (Assetto Corsa, first one).”

        Oh great, the only game I have any interest in playing…

        • circuitfarmer
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          6 months ago

          The instructions for getting it to run are all over Protondb (needs winetricks), and even then, it looks like a minority of hardware configs that have issues – perhaps even AMD specifically.

          Edit: also it looks like it may work OOTB now if you start it using Glorious Eggroll’s Proton 7.2 or higher

    • @[email protected]
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      366 months ago

      Is anyone else bothered by the 100% better statement?

      100% better is twice as good, not infinitely better which is what’s happening here. This is dividing by 0.

      • Xanthrax
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        6 months ago

        It’s better 100% of the time, when it’s doesn’t work on Linux.

        Also, I’m sexy 100% of time, when I am sexy (which is 0% percent of the time).

    • @[email protected]
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      196 months ago

      IMO that is a disingenuous way to state that. It makes it sound like they had to work to find games that worked on Linux at all and suggests that most games do not. Which is far from the truth. Most games just work these days and it is only a handful that don’t, so only a handful work 100% better. Then it all really depends if you care about those few games or not.

      • Schwim Dandy
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        56 months ago

        Few games? Man, you and I are definitely having a different experience.

        • @[email protected]
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          6 months ago

          For years now I just buy Steam games without even checking compatibility. They just work. No joke on my partners a Windows machine they’ve bought the same game once or twice and it regularly crashes for them.

          There is of course luck in games I choose.

        • @[email protected]
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          26 months ago

          My guess is that some genres are going to be more problematic due to more extensive use of anti cheat. What are some of the games you’re having trouble with?

          • Schwim Dandy
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            26 months ago

            My issue(I think) is a combination of games utilizing anticheat(I’ve not gotten a single one to work yet) and also trying to play non-new games that were not designed during the Steam push for compatibility. I can’t use linux to play the games I like to play so I use a Win host for gaming and to run my linux install in a VM on the second screen.

        • interolivary
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          6 months ago

          I do all my gaming on my Steam Deck and I haven’t run into anything that didn’t work – even “unverified” games. But I also eg. don’t play any multiplayer games so I don’t have troubles with anti-cheat systems which are apparently still a big pain point for Linux gaming and might be one reason for your bad experiences

        • @[email protected]
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          Edit: ah, i believe you hadn’t enabled Proton. Yeah, i can see why you’d have the misconception that Linux sucks for gaming (well, if you ONLY play certain multiplayer games and don’t branch out to others, yeah you might have a rough time).

          A lotta distros don’t even work with Steam

          Having been a chronic distrohopper since I joined Linux a couple of years ago, this is wrong. I’ve had some hiccups with Steam, yeah, but that was more the version of Steam I installed (Flatpak. Learned right quick to just install what was on the repos) and it didn’t not outright work on any of the distros I used: be they Fedora, Ubuntu-based, Arch-based, or OpenSUSE. Steam’s always worked

          I don’t think a single Bethesda Release works on Linux

          They do. I regularly play and mod Oblivion, Fallout New Vegas, and Skyrim and can play as well as one does on Windows. It’s not limited to those either: Doom, Evil Within, Ghostwire, Rage…all those work with very little configuration (which honestly is just personal prefrences on my part. They’ll still work by enabling Proton in the Steam settings, and in the game properties if you wanna be extra sure or are using a GE version of Proton). Starfield also works. So it’s not just oldies either.

          No Fromsoftware…Lies of P doesn’t.

          Except I play Souls and Souls-likes all the time, and I’m currently playing Lies of P with no problems on Linux. If anything I had more problems with when i tried playing a Soulsborn on Windows. Elden Ring stuttered like crazy on Windows, but i had next to zero problem playing on my Arch install, even playing Multiplayer.

          The other games you mentioned are also playable on Linux. Don’t know who told you they don’t but 90% of Steam works on Limux and Steam Deck. Just go to account settings and in compatibility, check “Enable Steam Play for all titles” and restart Steam. Otherwise, you get ONLY games with a native Linux version (which are…hit or miss at times). The only games you’d actually have trouble running on Linux would be ones that were given a hard “we’re not supporting Linux” like Fortnite and those with heavy Anti-Cheats like Rainbow 6 Seige, Black Desert, or Valorant (and even those are getting Linux compatability: Dead By Daylight works now, Master Cheif collection apparantly works now, but I haven’t played it in a while to check, Apex has worked for a while, etc)

          • @[email protected]
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            16 months ago

            check “Enable Steam Play for all titles” and restart Steam. Otherwise, you get ONLY games with a native Linux version (which are…hit or miss at times).

            I don’t think this is fully true. You get all native games plus all verified games. Which is only a small subset of games overall, but quite a bit more than just the native games. Though most others do work and only really require toggling that switch.

        • TimLovesTech (AuDHD)(he/him)
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          66 months ago

          Elden Ring, Uncharted, and God of War absolutely work because on Linux is the only way I’ve played any of them. Starfield has been the only game recently that did not (still doesn’t) work on Linux via Steam without issue. And Starfield is a Nvidia issue not really a Linux issue.

            • @[email protected]
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              36 months ago

              Did you enable Proton in your account settings? If not, you’re only going to be able to play native Steam games (which are both meh, and are at the mercy of how much the devs maintained it, or are incomplete like the Binding of Isaac one not having an Afterbirth DLC linux version so without Proton, you wouldn’t be able to access it).

              If you haven’t and are still on Linux, go to your account, find the compatability tab, and check “Enable Steam Play for all titles”. Steam will ask to restart, and after a restart, you’ll be good

            • @[email protected]
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              36 months ago

              Damn you really don’t know what you are talking about, yet you speak so confidentially.

              For future reference just bc a game doesn’t have a native Linux version doesn’t mean it won’t run on Linux and that logo you are looking at specifically talks about what OS the game is specifically made for.

              out of my current library of ~250ish games about 30 have native Linux ports and out of my 20 recently played games only Terraria has a native Linux ports (I still use the windows version anyways) hell I am currently playing Control with ray tracing

            • @[email protected]
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              6 months ago

              The Linux OS symbol only tells you if the game is Linux native or not. Since valve released proton it is not very useful. The deck Verified/Deck Playable symbols are a far better indication of if a game will work. But even then, quite a few of the unsupported games still work on Linux overall, just less well on the deck. ProtonDB is the more definitive source of if a game will work as well as any tweaks you can do to make it run better.

        • Skelectus
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          6 months ago

          Edit: Oh sorry, I missed the other reply thread.

          EA games and such sound plausible, but

          No fromsoft

          I have probably played their whole steam catalogue on linux. They work fine.

          Same for TES and Fallout.

          Just to make sure, you did enable proton for “unsupported” games, right?

            • @[email protected]
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              26 months ago

              I don’t know why valve does that. I consider myself a pretty informed consumer, and I was under the impression (I believe rightfully so!) that if the Linux logo is not featured, then the game can’t play on any Linux distro more or less.

              Could be some legality issue where a game they cannot Mark a game which is not linux native with the linux logo

              • @[email protected]
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                26 months ago

                I think it is a simpler case of legacy. They had the Linux/Windows/Mac symbols before proton was a thing and back then you needed it to be a native Linux game for it to work on Linux. Or you had to install all of steam inside wine and had pot luck as to if anything would work. Since they released proton they have kept the OS symbols the same. And since they released the steam deck they have added new deck verified/deck playable symbols which are a much better indication of playability on Linux.

                Maybe not the best marketing. But I don’t think it is really due to legality issues, more so legacy ones.

                • Skelectus
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                  16 months ago

                  It’s probably just to not falsely advertise support when some of the untested games don’t work.

        • circuitfarmer
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          26 months ago

          Idk man a ton of distros don’t even work with steam

          Name one. I don’t know of any.

          I don’t think a single Bethesda release works on Linux

          Personally I’ve never had one not work, and that includes Starfield on launch day.

          No PlayStation ports do either iirc

          Elder Scrolls on Linux didn’t have the stutter it had on Windows at launch. It was literally a better experience and it continues to run great. God of War runs great on Linux. Returnal runs great on Linux.

          Seriously, the number one issue for Linux gaming right now is people in comments telling other people it doesn’t work.

    • @[email protected]
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      136 months ago

      This seems a little exaggerated. For example, over 10k games are Steam Deck playable/verified. About 75% of the games that were tested were compatible with the Steam Deck, so probably many more will follow. Also, all emulators work on Linux too and sometimes even better than on Windows. The number of games that are available to you on Linux is simply massive.

    • LazaroFilm
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      56 months ago

      Things are changing. The SteamDeck is a Linux platform. So if you want that share of the market, you need Linux support

  • @[email protected]
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    176 months ago

    It’s a shame I need Adobe to run flawlessly for work or I’d switch over. I’m so tired of Microsoft.

    • @[email protected]
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      106 months ago

      If it’s photoshop that programs been solid for about a decade under wine.

      Idk about the other stuff.

    • @[email protected]
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      86 months ago

      A VM might be a solution for you? I have a single Windows program that I need for work. I chose a VM rather than futzing with wine because it’s a solution I know will work. I just run the VM for that during work and shut it down at the end of the workday.

      • bitwolf
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        6 months ago

        Second this. If you make the effort for vfio and use a 2nd monitor and a kvm (or a 2nd + kb/m) it doesn’t even feel like you’re using a VM.

        But, if your job requires you to use their computer a docking station could suffice.

    • Reverse Module
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      146 months ago

      OP of the original video here. Wait till you see the Nvidia Optimus results. Even I was dumbdfounded by them. Windows is SOOOO bloated it’s thermal throttling like no tomorrow on my laptop. Linux is about 20% faster even on Nvidia. XD

  • @[email protected]
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    146 months ago

    Aside from performance, I also noticed that older PC games work better on Linux than Windows nowadays. I really enjoy playing games from the late 90’s to early 2000’s, and they tend to run great on Linux with proton. Just the last year I’ve played all of Baldurs Gate 1, Icewind Dale 1 and Icewind Dale 2 on my scrappy Lenovo laptop and it’s been great.

  • Fushuan [he/him]
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    126 months ago

    I like how they show ffxiv, do addons work too though? I can’t play without dalamud (I can but, fuuuck) so that’s 1 down already.

    • @[email protected]
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      156 months ago

      The Dalamud FAQ had Linux install steps so imma guess it does work

      Which means it’s prolly time for me to swap back to Linux

      • @[email protected]
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        26 months ago

        It does indeed work. I’ve been playing ffxiv on linux with plugins since the release of endwalker. If you’re on arch, you can use the xivlauncher package from the aur. Or if you’re not on arch, there’s a flatpak for it (which is what is recommended for the steam deck for example)

      • Fushuan [he/him]
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        16 months ago

        Yeah, I plan on guying a new SSD card and plug it in with a USB 3.0 adapter to hack a new SSD slot for my mobo and test linux without losing anything. There’s more games I’m doubtful but I’ll admit that I haven’t looked it up yet.

    • @[email protected]
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      66 months ago

      Yes, plugins work really well on linux. Use xivlauncher, available through git or aur. Every addon that i have tried has worked flawlessly. Use IINACT for parsing, it’s a plugin version of ACT that is much more stable than standalone ACT in my experience, albeit with fewer config options

  • @[email protected]
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    106 months ago

    With proton the benefit can be +/- by quite a large margin to the point where I wouldn’t rely on this data to say that Linux is faster by default. Though it’s promising that Linux CAN compete with windows in performance despite the added layer of abstraction necessary to run many titles.

  • TWeaK
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    16 months ago

    The key takeaway here isn’t that Linux is faster, it’s that bloat in Windows has gotten so bad that the performance hit is worse than running emulation.

  • @[email protected]
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    -86 months ago

    17% faster than the majority of other players out there is kind of cheating, if you think about it.

    • @[email protected]
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      46 months ago

      So then buying a brand new 560hz monitor must be cheating to you as well then? I’d say mayyyybe 2% of players, at most, are running 560hz monitors right now.

      Are they cheating because some people are still using 60hz hardware?

  • @[email protected]
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    6 months ago

    Great, but I can still only realistically play a portion of my library with friends on Windows.

    • Skelectus
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      196 months ago

      Compatibility isn’t perfect, but I have to ask, what does your library look like if so few games in it work?

      • @[email protected]
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        46 months ago

        Most recently the pain in the ass games have been AoE4, and BeamMP. AoE4 crashes in muliplayer, there is a patch for that crash on protondb, but it seems I’m also impacted by an AMD related bug that happens intermittently and will restart X at a random times specifically due to playing AoE4. Tried various kernels and video cards, still crashes.

        BeamMP, looks like a lot of people have this issue, some have been able to resolve it.

        Civ6 used to have stability issues, the Linux client is a joke, I use the proton version because it’s more stable.

        • Skelectus
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          46 months ago

          Ah, I see.

          Linux client is a joke, I use the proton version because it’s more stable.

          This isn’t uncommon. Proton is way better if the developer half-assed the port.

          Also, this reminded me that I wanted to try BeamMP. Sucks if it’s unplayable.

    • @[email protected]
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      186 months ago

      I’ll boldly say that unless you have a multitude of games relying on anticheat, 90% of your game library works out of the box or just needs a little tinkering with Proton.